Feature Story, Online edition!

Would you still lead if…..?

WHY ARE YOU IN LEADERSHIP?


So, you’re a leader. Great! And with your leadership certain perks and benefits: maybe a nice salary (more than others on your staff), reserved parking space, nice office, credit card for expenses, iPhone and iPad, gasoline mileage, etc., all provided because you’re a leader. Imagine for a moment that you as a leader didn’t have this lifestyle, these benefits, and this recognition. Would you still be a leader?


What if no one had to think your way was always the best way? What if you didn’t always have to have the final word? What if you had to listen more than you spoke? What if being “in charge” meant that your job was to see others succeed, to put them and their interests first? What if those you led got ALL the credit? Would you still want to lead?


What if all you received was the pleasure of seeing others grow to greater character, achieve more than even they imagined, and you were the spark, the catalyst, the mentor throughout the process? They received the applause, the “well done,” the pat on the back, and respect from others. No one knew what you did. Would you still be motivated to lead? Could you handle NOT being in the spotlight?


Servant Leadership is hard work; it’s a tough deal. There is a downside. Perhaps it should come with a Surgeon General’s Warning: May cause headache, nausea, loss of appetite, loss of sleep, anxiety, indecision, loneliness, depression, and stress.


Here’s a question every servant leader should ask, “What am I in it for?” If we’re in it only for ourselves, we’ll do more getting than giving, expect more from others and less from ourselves, be more willing to be served than to serve. Servant leaders are into self-sacrifice, not self-promotion, like the Lord Jesus, who “made himself nothing, taking the very nature of the servant. . . and became obedient to death—-EVEN death on a cross!” (Philippians 2: 7, 8) He served so well it killed Him.

Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop. He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site iswww.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com.

Feature Story, Online edition!

Integrity in Leadership, Part 3, Walking with God

ANOTHER MARK OF INTEGRITY: Walking with God, By Fred Campbell

A noted writer on leadership, John Maxwell, has written: “Your gifts and skills might get you to the top, but only your character will keep you there.” That’s why Daniel’s bio is intriguing. His character was flawless when he was at the top of the ladder and at the bottom of the lion’s den. He went in with integrity and came out with it.

We’ve discovered Daniel had a fabulous work ethic, both in his attitude and performance. He did his work well because he saw it well. The two go together. Also, Daniel had a blameless character. His peers did their best to dig up some dirt to discredit Daniel in the eyes of the king. Didn’t work. The guy was squeaky clean—morally upright, honest, above reproach, trustworthy. THAT’S INTEGRITY. CHARACTER RULES!

The peer group didn’t back off. Daniel 6: 5 reads that the only way the “dirt mob” might find any basis for charges against Daniel was in something to do with “the law of his God.” So, they appealed to the king’s ego and manipulated him to sign an irrevocable law, ordering the people to pray homage only to the king for 30 days. If they didn’t, they would be the evening meal for starving lions.

Daniel wasn’t deterred by the new law. It was his daily practice to pray three times in front of a window facing Jerusalem. Even a death threat couldn’t stop him. For Daniel, it was a no-brainer. Maybe he reasoned, “I’ll pray, why shouldn’t I? Always have, always will. If I die, I die. Gotta go out some way.” 

Here’s a third mark of Daniel’s integrity—DANIEL HAD AN UNBENDING WALK WITH GOD.

Honestly now, how’s your walk with the Lord? Do you have one? Are you consistent? What keeps you from a consistent walk with your Lord? What will you do to become more consistent?

Do you worship regularly or hit and miss? Beyond Sunday worship, do you allow time for the Lord to speak to you through His dynamic Word? Do you pray? Is it because you have to or because you cannot live without it?

The Lord’s heart beats for leaders to walk with Him. “Yet the Lord longs to be gracious to you.” (Isaiah 30:18). 

CONSISTENCY IN YOUR WALK WITH THE LORD JESUS BREEDS INTEGRITY IN YOUR LIFE.

Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop. He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site iswww.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com.

Feature Story, Online edition!, Uncategorized

ANOTHER MARK OF INTEGRITY: Walking with God (Part 2).

ANOTHER MARK OF INTEGRITY: Walking with God

By: Fred Campbell

A noted writer on leadership, John Maxwell, has written: “Your gifts and skills might get you to the top, but only your character will keep you there.” That’s why Daniel’s bio is intriguing. His character was flawless when he was at the top of the ladder and at the bottom of the lion’s den. He went in with integrity and came out with it.

We’ve discovered Daniel had a fabulous work ethic, both in his attitude and performance. He did his work well because he saw it well. The two go together. Also, Daniel had a blameless character. His peers did their best to dig up some dirt to discredit Daniel in the eyes of the king. Didn’t work. The guy was squeaky clean—morally upright, honest, above reproach, trustworthy. THAT’S INTEGRITY. CHARACTER RULES!

The peer group didn’t back off. Daniel 6: 5 reads that the only way the “dirt mob” might find any basis for charges against Daniel was in something to do with “the law of his God.” So, they appealed to the king’s ego and manipulated him to sign an irrevocable law, ordering the people to pray homage only to the king for 30 days. If they didn’t, they would be the evening meal for starving lions.

Daniel wasn’t deterred by the new law. It was his daily practice to pray three times in front of a window facing Jerusalem. Even a death threat couldn’t stop him. For Daniel, it was a no-brainer. Maybe he reasoned, “I’ll pray, why shouldn’t I? Always have, always will. If I die, I die. Gotta go out some way.” 

Here’s a third mark of Daniel’s integrity—DANIEL HAD AN UNBENDING WALK WITH GOD.

Honestly now, how’s your walk with the Lord? Do you have one? Are you consistent? What keeps you from a consistent walk with your Lord? What will you do to become more consistent?

Do you worship regularly or hit and miss? Beyond Sunday worship, do you allow time for the Lord to speak to you through His dynamic Word? Do you pray? Is it because you have to or because you cannot live without it?

The Lord’s heart beats for leaders to walk with Him. “Yet the Lord longs to be gracious to you.” (Isaiah 30:18). 

CONSISTENCY IN YOUR WALK WITH THE LORD JESUS BREEDS INTEGRITY IN YOUR LIFE.

Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop. He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site iswww.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com.

Feature Story, Online edition!

Leadership Character, Meeting the Demands of Reality

Leadership Character

John Wooden, coach of the UCLA Bruins, was a cut above other leaders. During his tenure, he coached the Bruins to 10 national basketball championships in 12 years, 7 in a row. He was relentless when it came to character development among his players. In his book They Call Me Coach, he wrote, “Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation, because your character is what you really are while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”

It seems that personal character gets little attention and work when it comes to leadership. When was the last time in a leader’s training and education they took a course on:

• dealing with relentless temptation?
• losing well?
• handling a situation that derails the leader?
• what to do when everything has been lost?
• what to do when people don’t follow the leader?

Surely there’s more to leadership than the skills, abilities, and techniques that supposedly bring prosperity and success.

Mark Miller (The Heart of a Leader) likens leadership to an iceberg. “How much of the iceberg sits above the waterline? Only 10% is visible while 90% lies below the waterline—unseen, invisible. Let the part above represent leadership skills, the things leaders do; the part below represents leadership character, what a leader is. 90% of a leader’s effectiveness is determined by what’s below the waterline.

Leadership character ultimately drives what leaders do, why they do it, and how they handle a negative reality.Many leaders spend a lot of time and energy developing the 10% above the water.

They earn BBA/MBA degrees from fine universities.

Spend hours attending leadership seminars and courses.

Seek professional consultation.

Work hard, make major decisions, and lead countless meetings.

Communicate and listen.

They do whatever it takes to make them “successful,” “great,” “prosperous.”

However, how much time do they spend developing the 90% of their leadership character, who they really are as people? If little to no time is spent, are they not like a man who built a nice house—beautiful, big, comfortable, loaded with luxury. The house looked good, impressive, well-built, but it was foolishly constructed on beach sand. You’ve heard the story. When a hurricane hit, the house collapsed—like a valued, long-term client saying NO to a multimillion proposal you must have, your business going bankrupt, key people who made your company successful leaving, your marriage ending, your family falling apart, your ministry dwindling.

Then what?

“CHARACTER IS THE ABILITY TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF REALITY” (Henry Cloud, Integrity)

Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop. He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site iswww.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com.

Feature Story, Online edition!, Uncategorized

Are you “Leading with Integrity?” 4 good questions for growth.

A Leader of Integrity

Some believe that personal character has little to do with leadership. Do you agree? If so, then ask yourself these questions:

Do people of low character influence you and inspire you to action?

Do you have good relationships with people of low character?

Do you admire people of low character?

Would you welcome them leading you?

Like it or not, agree or disagree, character counts in leadership. Warren Bennis, who has studied and written extensively on leadership, says, “Leadership is character in action.” “Ninety-nine percent of leadership failures are failures of character.” (General Norman Schwarzkopf)

The greatest character quality is integrity. Integrity is what people will remember about you more than your brilliance, ingenuity, competency, and energy. Integrity (or lack of it) is your legacy, what people remember about you.

Daniel, an Older Testament leader, incarnated integrity. As a Jewish teenager, he was exiled to Babylon. In Daniel 6, at the age of 80, he’s a leading official in the godless Persian system. Darius the Persian king appointed 120 managers (satraps) to run his kingdom and over the managers were 3 administrators (or, Vice Presidents). Daniel was a VP, a top-level position, just under the king. Power was at his disposal. He had respect and elite status. The king could trust Daniel. Over the years, he never lost his integrity in this God-hating Persian system.

Several things stand out. First, Daniel had a fabulous work ethic. “Daniel distinguished himself among the administrators and managers BY HIS EXCEPTIONAL QUALITIES and the king planned to promote him over the whole kingdom.” (Daniel 6:3) “Exceptional qualities” is literally “an extraordinary spirit.” Daniel stood out. He wasn’t like everyone else. He did his work well because he saw it well. His perspective shaped his work performance. Daniel excelled. When review time came, he was promoted.

How’s your work? Do you do it well? Are you the best leader you can be?

How’s your attitude? Granted we all have bad days, but is every day a bad day? Is the problem a bad day or a bad life?

Are you easy to work for or with? How would others rate your leadership performance? Are you a tough guy, the boss, control freak, or a servant leader who is considerate and respectful of others and their ideas?

How’s your spiritual perspective toward your leadership? Does God fit into your leadership role every day?

A MARK OF INTEGRITY IS EXCELLENCE ON THE JOB, BOTH IN PERFORMANCE AND ATTITUDE.

(To be continued)

Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop. He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site is www.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com.

Feature Story, Online edition!

Leadership Character and Integrity, by Fred Campbell

Leadership Character and Integrity

Leadership Character

John Wooden, coach of the UCLA Bruins, was a cut above other leaders. During his tenure, he coached the Bruins to 10 national basketball championships in 12 years, 7 in a row. He was relentless when it came to character development among his players. In his book They Call Me Coach, he wrote, “Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation, because your character is what you really are while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”


It seems that personal character gets little attention and work when it comes to leadership. When was the last time in a leader’s training and education they took a course on:


• dealing with relentless temptation?
• losing well?
• handling a situation that derails the leader?
• what to do when everything has been lost?
• what to do when people don’t follow the leader?


Surely there’s more to leadership than the skills, abilities, and techniques that supposedly bring prosperity and success.


Mark Miller (The Heart of a Leader) likens leadership to an iceberg. “How much of the iceberg sits above the waterline? Only 10% is visible while 90% lies below the waterline—unseen, invisible. Let the part above represent leadership skills, the things leaders do; the part below represents leadership character, what a leader is. 90% of a leader’s effectiveness is determined by what’s below the waterline.

Leadership character ultimately drives what leaders do, why they do it, and how they handle a negative reality.”

Many leaders spend a lot of time and energy developing the 10% above the water.
*They earn BBA/MBA degrees from fine universities.
*Spend hours attending leadership seminars and courses.
*Seek professional consultation.
*Work hard, make major decisions, and lead countless meetings.
*Communicate and listen.
*They do whatever it takes to make them “successful,” “great,” “prosperous.”

However, how much time do they spend developing the 90% of their leadership character, who they really are as people? If little to no time is spent, are they not like a man who built a nice house—beautiful, big, comfortable, loaded with luxury. The house looked good, impressive, well-built, but it was foolishly constructed on beach sand.

You’ve heard the story. When a hurricane hit, the house collapsed—like a valued, long-term client saying NO to a multimillion proposal you must have, your business going bankrupt, key people who made your company successful leaving, your marriage ending, your family falling apart, your ministry dwindling.

Then what?

“CHARACTER IS THE ABILITY TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF REALITY” (Henry Cloud, Integrity)


Fred Campbell lives in Ovilla, Texas, just south of Dallas. He pastored two independent Bible churches for 40 years. Currently, he is the president of Living Grace Ministries, a ministry committed to helping churches develop servant leaders, following the model of the Lord Jesus. Fred has traveled to 29 countries and 15 states to lead the workshop.

He received his ThM from Dallas Theological Seminary and his D Min from Phoenix Seminary. Fred is married to Carolyn and has a married son and two grandchildren. His web site is www.livinggraceministries,com and his email is fred@livingraceministries.com